DevOps Porto

In the beginning of 2016 I started to build an idea with Miguel Alho about creating a DevOps group where developers, operations, coaches, managers and everyone else involved in the software development pipeline could share opinions, discuss different points of view and, most important,  learn from each other.

While we shared the same company (Miguel as developer, me as operations), we saw how important communication, negotiation and learning between development and operations was in order to relieve the delivery pain. We specially enjoyed the discussion process and the collaborative learning process. So we thought: why not to extend this to more people?

During a conference in June at Porto city I was able to meet Manuel Pais, DevOps Lisbon founder, and shared with him our intention of creating a DevOps group in Porto. He liked and encouraged us to materialize our idea. Filipe Correia, was part of that conference organization team, also liked the idea and got interested being a part of this DevOps adventure.

In July 2016 we launched the DevOps Porto group and added to the Filipe Correia to the team.

DevOps Porto – Who are we?

IT professionals from  the North of Portugal (especially Porto city) interested in the values, culture and practices related to DevOps.

DevOps Porto – Our mission

To build bridges between development and operations, communities, companies, PEOPLE.

DevOps Porto – Our Goals

  • Create a community around DevOps movement
  • Promote discussion around DevOps practices
  • Promote the sharing of DevOps related knowledge

DevOps Porto – Where you can find us?

We had our first meetp in October 2016 together with Agile Connect (our first bridge with a community) and our second meetup in January 2017 with Mindera (our first bridge with a company). Our plan for 2017 is to organize a meetup every two months, with the next one in March.

Meanwhile, the team has grown with Miguel David, Elisete Cruz and Cesar Rodrigues joining us. It’s a great team. Everyone is welcome to our meetups and to our team. Just search us on the meetup website or talk with us on slack. Join the team and help us to build bridges around DevOps.

#c9d9 Continuous Discussions – Open Source and DevOps

slide1During my vacations in August I participated on a Continuous Discussions (#c9d9) episode about Open Source and DevOps.

Continuous Discussions is a community initiative powered by Electric Cloud, and consists of a series of community panels about Agile, Continuous Delivery and Devops.

This formate, a discussion panel that debates different perspectives about a specific topic, surprised me with the interaction and fun that was to make part of this event. So, well done #c9d9, I really enjoyed.

Following, some insights from my contribution to the panel:

Open source – free as in beer or free as in puppy?

You always have a cost, independently if it’s open source ou closed source. The cost depends on the size of your team, the complexity of your tasks and the frequency of change. The good thing about open source is that you can contribute to the change and take it in your direction. That’s what I like the most in open source.

Where do you use open source?

Open source tools are used in some points of the development pipeline, like for example delivering changes to databases. If you are a startup company there is a high probability to use a lot of open source tools, and with the evolution and the complexity of your team/organization you will probably start to migrate to commercial tools. The rule is “try before you buy it”. You can combine open source and commercial tools like Jenkins, Team City, TFS Build, Octopus Deploy, etc. Even Microsoft is becoming more open.

Where would you not use an open source tool?

In big and complex systems. An important question is, what’s the common factor when you migrate to open source tool,  ot to an closed source tool, in both directions? In my opinion it’s the size aligned with complexity. So, use the right tool for the right job, open source or commercial tools.

Quality concerns?

First, if the open source tool role it’s to support your development pipeline, you have more flexibility to manage the exposure to errors. But, if the open source tool makes part of your product you have to take responsability for that integration, you have to assure that quality is there. Quality must be present everytime and everywhere, however if we are talking at develpoment pipeline level I have more flexibility, but if we are talking at costumer level I have to be more careful.

Security concerns?

Open source tools security concerns make part of the general security concerns. I try to make the development environment as closed as possible.

Legal concerns?

Both, open source and closed source has law concerns. Sometimes the decision is made at a higher level and you can not do anything, other times you can influence or even make the decision, at that time is better the read the license (you probably thinking “who does that?”).

You can see full episode here!

PortoData 28 July 2016 – Delivering changes for applications and databases

Last July at PortoData event I made my first co-presentation with my friend Miguel Alho (@MytyMyky) and the explored topic was the relationship between databases and applications in the development process.

apps_dbs

After doing some presentations about database developing process and DevOps, this presentation was the “missing link” that allows the audience to see the “big picture”.

The presentation chosen title was “Delivering changes for applications and databases” and its content is the result of the shared experience by me and Miguel at Celfinet. The challenges of the interaction/dependency between applications and databases were the main topic. We also explored the tools and process that helped us to overcome that challenges.

A good communication protocol between development and database/operations and automation, a lot of automation in the process definition, were the key factors to achieve our goal: a development pipeline which included source control, continuous integration and continuous delivery.

I presented my perspective of  database development while Miguel presented the application development perspective, we represented the common division between applications and operations. The audience reaction and questions about the way Miguel and I established a communication protocol and a development process that included databases and applications was very interesting. At the end of the presentation we were happy with the audience feedback, an experience to repeat I say!

Here are the slides from our presentation:


Scrum Portugal and the DevOps challenge

operations“How about the operations?” This was a recurring question in the conversations that I had with Nuno Rafael (@nrgomes). After several discussions about agile methodologies and his effects and challenges on the operations world I accepted his challenge to deliver a session at Scrum Portugal community about DevOps.

I decided to give my session, made at June 29, the following title: “DbOps, DevOps and Ops” because my first contact with operations was at database level (as DBA), then I progressed to infrastructure (as infrastructure team member) where I had to deal not only with infrastructure operations but also with operations related to applications.

So, my session tells my operations journey through databases, applications and infrastructure domains where the goal is to deliver software as fast as possible while achieving the balance between business goals and business deliverables. In other words, it’s my story about engineering practices within agile, using Scrum, Kanban, source control, database automation, continuous integration and continuous delivery.

The audience reaction to the presentation was quite good. I had questions made by operations people, development people and “agile” people, which made me satisfied. The session ended with a open discussion forum where I and the attendees had the chance to explore the covered topics with more detail.

I would like to thank all the Scrum Portugal team, first for the invitation and second for the way you welcome me. I was a very well organized event.

Here’s my session slides: